• Flash back to UCI 2010 promo shoot

    Earlier this year in the dim dark recesses of my office I found a box of old DVDs & CDs. I thought I should probably at least check them while I still had an optical drive and archive anything I hadn’t already, onto hard drives 

    Gold! 

    That’s what I found, in the form of a long forgotten behind the scenes video of a shoot some 6 1/2 years ago for the UCI held in Geelong, Victoria, Australia in 2010.

    Andrew from Agent Creative called me just after Christmas 2009 and said “Can you shoot some cyclists for us in the next few days?”

    Sure, of course, nobody is busy over New Years ......... Right?!?

    Find studios, one in Geelong and one in Ballarat for 04 & 07 January. 

    What could be hard about that? 

    Nobody answers their phone or returns calls, that’s what! On holiday! 

    Australia closes down between Christmas and mid-Jan. Photographic producers, assistants hair and make-up all Missing On Holiday!

    Try buying or processing film, thankfully we had digital.

    Then I found out who was to be photographed; 

    Jack Bobridge (winner of several Team & Individual Pursuit Championships including Mens under-23 time trial at the UCI World Championships 2009)

    Bridie O’Donnell (represented Australia at the UCI in 2008 & 2009, current World record holder for 1 hour)

    Some guy called Cadel Evans (UCI Pro Tour 2007, UCI World Road Race Champion 2009, amongst other accomplishments and soon Tour De France 2011 winner) 

    no great shakes!

    ... and here is the behind the scenes video!

    Producer Rachael Travis, Agent Creative.

    Art Director Andrew Gill, Agent Creative.

    Hair & make-up Bernadette Fisers.

    Assistant Kristoffer Paulsen.

    Jodie Gallacher worked her magic on the video and came up with this behind the scene piece. 

     

  • Jewellery, portraits, portrait, jewellery/jewelry, NYC!

    (so really more sculpture, just portable, & portraits)

    Since I last broadcast to you all I've been having fun!

    I've had the pleasure of shooting the world renowned jeweller Carlier Makigawa and her amazing work! 

    Her show is on until 09 April 2016 at Gallery Funaki and Art Jewelry Forum have published a very interesting interview with her.

    Been back at the Lost Trades Fair shooting the fantastic makers and wonderful people that come together to help make it so special. More about that later in the year.

    Then last week shot some lovely furniture for Artefact Furniture and made a quick portrait of Byron the man behind every artifact they produce!

    Also shooting Jo Hawley's jewellery before shipping it to NYC. She's been invited to participate in an annual contemporary jewellery event called LOOT held at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) from 11 to 16 April, 40 to 50 jewelers (that's how they spell it over there) from around the world are invited to attend each year. (In the interest of full disclosure Jo is my wife and thus has no choice but to use me to shoot her work AND take me along to NYC!) @johawleyjewellery 

  • Matthew Harding

    Most weeks I drive through or past the intersection of Flemington rd and Elliot ave. Elliot is the one that goes around the Zoo and through Royal Park.

    I have seen the sculpture on the corner there in all weather conditions and lights. I’ve blogged about it, Fruition - Matthew Harding. This was my introduction to Matt.

    Since the day I actually stopped, photographed the work and read the plaque, I’ve seen Matts work in several cities. Had the opportunity to photograph it, both in progress and complete. Also the pleasure of photographing him in action and studied.

    The work ranges from the ephemeral to the solid and grounded, sometimes managing both at once, quite a trick.

    I like the man and his work. I hope this shows in the shots.

  • Salt Printing

    I had been wanting to try salt printing for some time. It is the oldest process that we would recognize as being photographic and harks from the mid 1830’s when Henry Fox Talbot discovered it.

    It has an incredibly wide tonal range. (Without wanting to enter the dynamic range of blah vs blah debate at this juncture.)

    The thing that most drew me to the process were the blacks I had seen, deep dark velvety smooth impenetrable blacks that were nuanced and kept detail. I know, oxymoronic!

    What I had planned to do was shoot and contact print 3 different images on large format film to see how salt printing worked in various scenes. To this end I dragged my old Sinar out, gave it a bit of a dust and photographed one of my favorite rocky hills in central Victoria. That's as far as I got before I ran out of time. 

    So I shot some stuff on digital several days before the salt printing course that I was booked in to do with Ellie Young at Gold Street Studios. She is the Australian go to person for all things old through to ancient in photographic processes.

    The process is very enjoyable. It was great to get hands on and leave the computer behind for the day (once digital negs had been made of my images), lots of photographic smells in the air, most importantly time and space to discuss and ponder, a lovely slowing down and the thrill of watching the print come to life.

    I learnt that as well as being the oldest photographic process it is also the most fickle! Everything matters - paper moisture content, atmospheric humidity, thickness of coatings on paper, drying time between coats, favorite breakfast cereal and of course sock colour!

    I kid you NOT this shit is unforgiving!

    I don’t know if or how this lovely old process fits in to my practice, I do know it was fun and I hope to use salt printing again.

    Here are the images as colour jpgs and copies of the salt prints also as colour jpgs.


  • Home to home digital story exhibition; Geelong portraits

    The final iteration of "Home to home" opened on Tues 8th Sept at 11:00, it closes on 15 Sept’15.

    The exhibition is at Deakin Geelong Waterfront campus and is included in the Word for Word National Non-fiction Festival. The following are the portraits of the Geelong storytellers. The Cairns and Newcastle portraits went up to coincide with those exhibitions earlier this year.

    Jim Jolly, late 40’s was at risk of entering a nursing home.

    Russell Bramley, Russell’s wife lived in a nursing home for almost 3 years.

    Leanne Fitzgerald, late 40’s has lived in a nursing home for over 3 years.

    Debbie Sawyer, early 50’s has lived in a nursing home for over 7 years.

    The Fear Family, it was suggested that Paul move into a nursing home in his early teens.

    Rose Stolk, early 50’s has lived in a nursing home for over 6 years.

    Kirrily Hayward, late 20’s lives in a nursing home.

    Bree Synot, early 20’s avoided going into a nursing home.

    Angie Brown, early 60’s lives in a nursing home.

    In Australia, over 6000 young people under 65 live in nursing homes with people in their 80’s because there is nowhere else for them to go. Many of these people are socially isolated and receive visits from friends less than once a year. Established in 2006, the mission of the Summer Foundation is to resolve the issue of young people in nursing homes in Australia.

    The Summer Foundation works to raise awareness of this issue and to change human service policy and practice. Our aim is to increase the number and types of appropriate housing options for these young people. 

    This exhibition allows you to view the stories of people directly connected to the issue of young people in nursing homes, and to experience the achievements of these storytellers who faced their struggles and found hope.

    The videos are personal accounts created by storytellers who participated in Digital Story Workshops held in Newcastle, Cairns and Geelong in 2014. They are powerful stories, revealing a part of our society that is usually hidden away.”

  • A trug load of portraits! Lost Trades Fair 2015.

    On the Labor day weekend I was able to set up a “studio” at Kyneton racecourse to photograph the makers from the Lost Trades Fair, for the organizer, Lisa Rundell, of Rundell&Rundell, Lost Trades Fair and The Chairmaker’s Wife (she is very busy).

    The makers are a very passionate bunch with deep knowledge of their field and insatiable curiosity about other people’s work and craft.

    This made them exciting to meet and photograph. The fact that across the 2 days there were 14,000 visitors to the fair and the makers barely had time to take a breath let alone have a picture taken, along with constant protestations of “I’ll break your camera” made them quite a challenging subject matter!

    Here are some screen grabs.

    PS More than a little inspiration for the pictures was taken from Irving Penn’s “Small Trades” series.

  • Home to home digital story exhibition; Cairns portraits

    Gary McGee, late 40’s was at significant risk of living in a nursing home.

    Denis Cavanagh, early 60’s back living in a nursing home for the second time.

    Nita Carling, early 40’s avoided entering a nursing home.

    Shaun Gulliver, late 20’s was at significant risk of living in a nursing home.

    Eddie Pascoe, early 60’s has lived in and out of a nursing home in recent years.

    Constance Saveka, lived in a nursing home for over 2 years. Died 2014.

    (For cultural reasons her image can not be displayed on line at this stage.)

  • Home to home digital story exhibition; Newcastle portraits

    The portraits accompanying the short video pieces, that make up Home to home, are of some of the most interesting, generous and brave individuals I have had the pleasure and privilege to get to know and photograph. 

    On Tues 28th April the exhibition opened in Newcastle Museum. The following are the portraits of the Newcastle storytellers. 

    The Cairns and Geelong portraits will follow when those exhibitions open.

    In Australia, over 6000 young people under 65 live in nursing homes with people in their 80’s because there is nowhere else for them to go. Many of these people are socially isolated and receive visits from friends less than once a year. Established in 2006, the mission of the Summer Foundation is to resolve the issue of young people in nursing homes in Australia.

    The Summer Foundation works to raise awareness of this issue and to change human service policy and practice. Our aim is to increase the number and types of appropriate housing options for these young people. 

    This exhibition allows you to view the stories of people directly connected to the issue of young people in nursing homes, and to experience the achievements of these storytellers who faced their struggles and found hope.

    The videos are personal accounts created by storytellers who participated in Digital Story Workshops held in Newcastle, Cairns and Geelong in 2014. They are powerful stories, revealing a part of our society that is usually hidden away.”

     

    Aaron Hickey, early 30’s Lived in a nursing home for 6 years.

    James Nutt, late 20’s Lived in a nursing home for 6 years.

    Dom Coates, early 30’s Lived in a nursing home for 3 years.

    Colin Reid, late 40’s Lived in a nursing home for 2 years.

    James Bailey, late 20’s Has been living in a nursing home for over 7 years.

    Arron Masters, mid 30’s Lived in a nursing home for 3 years.

    Keryn Hickey Keryn’s son lived in a nursing home for 6 years.

    Installation shots at Newcastle Museum of section containing local portraits.

    Summer Foundation

    Newcastle Museum

  • low-fi not wifi weekend at Sandy Bay

    On a recent New Zealand trip we stayed in an old bach (pronounced batch = NZ beach shack) at Sandy Bay north of Whangarei. It was built by my father-in-law and two friends around the time Queen Elizabeth 2nd opened NZ parliament and the NZ cricket team won its first Test match.   

    We read books printed on paper not ebooks and went for walks not virtual tours. 

    However I didn’t take a film camera so I shot digital and pretended it was film by using the film emulation jpgs from my Fujifilm X-E1 for this post.

    We arrived late afternoon on a very overcast day with the mist starting to roll in.

    The next 2 days were filled with very low level activity and ice-cream, though I have managed to avoid any evidence.

    Went for a short walk early before we had to leave, saw tidal pools and silhouettes, one of my favorite things is creating photographic Scherenschnitt.

    On the way back to Auckland we had lunch at a cafe by the beach with stunning views.



  • Mssrs McAuliffe and McCaughey do lunch

    Mssrs McAuliffe and McCaughey do lunch

    Late last year Patrick McCaughey was in Australia to promote his book "Strange Country: Why Australian Painting Matters", published by MUP.

    Art Guide Australia asked me to photograph these two wise men of Australian art having lunch and discussing "Why Australian Art Matters". I dressed well and skipped breakfast hoping for at least a little dessert (the most important part of any meal). No food was forthcoming!

    I did however get these pictures and Patrick's autograph in my copy of his fine tome.

    To read Chris' words and see the matter resolved go to Art Guide Australia.